insure logo

Why you should trust Insure.com

quality icon

Quality Verified

At Insure.com, we are committed to providing honest and reliable information so that you can make the best financial decisions for you and your family. All of our content is written and reviewed by industry professionals and insurance experts. We maintain strict editorial independence from insurance companies to maintain editorial integrity, so our recommendations are unbiased and are based on a comprehensive list of criteria.

Roommates and insuranceHomeowners insurance typically covers the homeowner and their personal property. It also provides liability coverage for certain events that occur on the property. However, it generally does not cover roommates or their personal belongings.

In today’s economy, having a roommate may seem like an ideal solution for a stretched budget. However, before taking that step, you should consider how having a roommate may affect your auto, homeowner, or renter’s insurance.

Does homeowners insurance cover my roommate?

Homeowners insurance typically covers the homeowner and their personal property. It also provides liability coverage for certain events that occur on the property. However, it generally does not cover roommates or their personal belongings.

Roommates are considered separate from the homeowner’s immediate family. If your roommate wants coverage for their personal property and liability, they need to purchase their own renters insurance policy.

Can I add my roommates to my homeowners insurance policy?

Talk to your insurance agent before you take on a roommate so that you are fully aware of all the implications on your policy.

“Depending on the company’s underwriting guidelines, listing a roommate on the policy can increase the premium or require a different type of policy,” says Wendy Blitstein, director of underwriting at Security First Insurance.

If your roommate causes a loss and you haven’t told your insurance company about them, your coverage could be in jeopardy. Not all policies include liability or personal property coverage for roommates.

“Many insurance companies will require that you purchase an additional policy for each roommate,” Blitstein says. “Numbers matter. If you own a home and add one or two roommates, there is usually no problem. However, if you add three, your carrier may refuse to insure you”, says Frank Darras, founding partner of DarrasLaw.

Should your roommates get their own renters insurance policy?

Each roommate should have his or her own separate renters insurance policy. “Their stuff isn’t covered under your homeowners policy,” says Kevin Lynch,  assistant professor of insurance at The American College.

More roommates mean more exposure for the owner. For example, if your roommate has a dog, you may be impacted. 

“Be aware [that] even if it’s not your pet, you may be sued if a guest is bitten because you knew or should have known of the pet’s propensity to bite,” says Darras.

Can my partner be listed on my homeowners insurance policy?

If you are the sole owner of the house, your partner’s belongings may not be automatically covered by the homeowners insurance policy. To ensure coverage for your partner’s valuable personal property, it’s important to check with your homeowners insurance company. They may require your partner to be on the deed, but if not, it’s advisable for your partner to consider purchasing a separate renters insurance policy.

Renters insurance covers personal belongings, such as furniture, clothing, electronics, and other valuable items, from covered perils like theft, fire, vandalism, or natural disasters such as hurricanes and earthquakes.

Do I need renters insurance if I move in with my partner?

If you are moving in with someone who has a homeowners policy and you are not married, you must get your own renters insurance policy. This is because the homeowners policy will only cover their home and belongings in the event of a disaster or theft, not your belongings. Your renters insurance policy will provide insurance coverage for your property and belongings in the event of a disaster, theft, fire, or other unfortunate incidents.

Your homeowners insurance will cover your liability, your belongings, and your home, but it will not cover your roommate’s belongings. They need to have a renters insurance policy in case there’s a storm, fire, or other disaster.

author image
Shivani Gite
Contributing Writer

 
|
  

Shivani Gite is a personal finance and insurance writer with a degree in journalism and mass communication. She is passionate about making insurance topics easy to understand for people and helping them make better financial decisions.